Dhea and testosterone replacement therapy

Because there is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of DHEA products (they are not usually regulated by the Food and Drug Administration), it’s important to read labels, do your research when buying supplements and follow directions. ( 11 ) The University of Maryland Medical Center advises that you try to purchase DHEA directly from a doctor in order to ensure it’s authentic and not contaminated. DHEA comes in capsule, tablet, chewing gum, sublingual (under the tongue) drop and topical (on the skin) cream form, but the type you’ll want to use depends on what you’re using it for. ( 12 )

Total testosterone goes down by about 1-2% per year , starting sometime in your 30s, and bioavailable testosterone decreases by about 2-3% a year. Those numbers can be pretty misleading though. Men approaching middle age tend to exercise a lot less, and eat a lot worse. So nobody really knows what a “natural” decline in testosterone looks like, on a population-wide basis. It’s kind of like saying muscle mass decreases 1-2% a year once you hit middle age … that decrease can have a lot to do with more time spent on work and family, and less time spent trying to get ripped to attract a partner (among other reasons, of course).

We feel like 25 mg is a smart, conservative dosage: The minimum amount needed to restore DHEA to a younger state. Notably, some research shows that exercise helps maintain DHEA levels in older people, 10 which makes us wonder if these populations should just start an exercise routine instead of buying DHEA supplements. *Inside Scoop: About that Big Warning… Not all, but the best, most reputable supplement makers all have highly detailed, scary side effects listed on their DHEA products. They practically look like cigarette warnings. Why is this? It traces back to a decree by the State of California, which was probably motivated by DHEA controversies, including the NBA, NFL, and NCAA bans. Some feel the warning is ridiculous. Whether warranted or not, it definitely adds to DHEA’s reputation of potency and power. Here’s what it looks like:

Serum levels of the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) peak in men and women in the third decade of life and decrease progressively with age. Increasing numbers of middle-aged and older individuals consume over-the-counter preparations of DHEA, hoping it will retard aging by increasing muscle and bone mass and strength, decreasing fat, and improving immunologic and neurobehavioral functions. Because DHEA can serve as a precursor to more potent androgens and estrogens, like testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and 17beta-estradiol (E2), supplemental DHEA use may pose a cancer risk in patients with nascent or occult prostate cancer. The steroid-responsive human LNCaP prostate cancer cells, containing a functional but mutated androgen receptor (AR), were used to compare effects of DHEA with those of T, DHT, and E2 on cell proliferation and protein and/or gene expression of AR, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), IGF-I, IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), IGF-II, IGF-binding proteins-2, -3, and -5, (IGFBPs-2, -3, and -5), and estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta). Cell proliferation assays revealed significant stimulation by all four steroids. DHEA- and E2-induced responses were similar but delayed and reduced compared with that of T and DHT. All four hormones increased gene and/or protein expression of PSA, IGF-IR, IGF-I, and IGFBP-2 and decreased that of AR, ERbeta, IGF-II, and IGFBP-3. There were no significant effects of hormone treatment on IGFBP-5 mRNA. DHEA and E2 responses were similar, and distinct from those of DHT and T, in time- and dose-dependent studies. Further studies of the mechanisms of DHEA effects on prostate cancer epithelial cells of varying AR status, as well as on prostate stromal cells, will be required to discern the implications of DHEA supplementation on prostatic health.

Dhea and testosterone replacement therapy

dhea and testosterone replacement therapy

Serum levels of the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) peak in men and women in the third decade of life and decrease progressively with age. Increasing numbers of middle-aged and older individuals consume over-the-counter preparations of DHEA, hoping it will retard aging by increasing muscle and bone mass and strength, decreasing fat, and improving immunologic and neurobehavioral functions. Because DHEA can serve as a precursor to more potent androgens and estrogens, like testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and 17beta-estradiol (E2), supplemental DHEA use may pose a cancer risk in patients with nascent or occult prostate cancer. The steroid-responsive human LNCaP prostate cancer cells, containing a functional but mutated androgen receptor (AR), were used to compare effects of DHEA with those of T, DHT, and E2 on cell proliferation and protein and/or gene expression of AR, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), IGF-I, IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), IGF-II, IGF-binding proteins-2, -3, and -5, (IGFBPs-2, -3, and -5), and estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta). Cell proliferation assays revealed significant stimulation by all four steroids. DHEA- and E2-induced responses were similar but delayed and reduced compared with that of T and DHT. All four hormones increased gene and/or protein expression of PSA, IGF-IR, IGF-I, and IGFBP-2 and decreased that of AR, ERbeta, IGF-II, and IGFBP-3. There were no significant effects of hormone treatment on IGFBP-5 mRNA. DHEA and E2 responses were similar, and distinct from those of DHT and T, in time- and dose-dependent studies. Further studies of the mechanisms of DHEA effects on prostate cancer epithelial cells of varying AR status, as well as on prostate stromal cells, will be required to discern the implications of DHEA supplementation on prostatic health.

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